Tag: New York

Where I was on 9/11

twintowers

Adapted from an essay of the same title, originally published September 11, 2011

I thought it was an accident. When my high school principal announced over the PA system that the World Trade Center had been hit by a plane. I distinctly remember hearing someone in the back of the class mutter, “terrorism.”

It’s an interesting juxtaposition sixteen years later. In some ways, it seems like a lifetime ago. While at the same time, I remember it like it was yesterday. Almost every year on September 11, I watch different documentaries about that day. And it’s never any less shocking that that happened. Continue reading “Where I was on 9/11”

Where I was on 9/11

twintowers

Based on an essay of the same title, originally published September 11, 2011

I thought it was an accident. When my high school principal announced over the PA system that the World Trade Center had been hit by a plane. I distinctly remember hearing someone in the back of the class mutter, “terrorism.”

I was taking a quiz in my third period geometry class fifteen years ago. I was 15 years old, and a sophomore in high school.

I’ve changed a lot over these last fifteen years; we’ve all changed a lot over these last ten years. Continue reading “Where I was on 9/11”

The eve of infamy and where I was on 9/11

Photo courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons
Flickr Creative Commons

Originally posted September 11, 2012

As I write these words, the stresses of everyday life come to mind. I think of how busy I am between school, work, and other commitments. I’m so often short-sighted and allow myself to get frustrated. It’s getting late and I jot some thoughts down before going to sleep. On this night, my thoughts are on the past and with people I’ve never met. Thirteen years ago tonight, thousands of Americans went to bed, unaware that it was the eve of their last day on earth.

For me, that’s surreal. Monday was an ordinary start to the work week. In the evening, people played with their kids, and watched Monday Night Football, and kissed their spouses goodnight. They prepared to go on flights for work, or vacation, or just to make it home. They thought about what bill needed to be paid and the home repair which needed to be completed. They went to sleep like it was any other night and woke up to a beautiful Tuesday morning. Continue reading “The eve of infamy and where I was on 9/11”

The eve of infamy; and where I was on 9/11

Photo courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons
Flickr Creative Commons

As I write these words, the stresses of everyday life come to mind. I think of how busy I am between school, work, and other commitments. I’m so often shortsighted and allow myself to get frustrated. It’s getting late and I jot some thoughts down before going to sleep. On this night, my thoughts are on the past and with people I’ve never met. Eleven years ago tonight, thousands of Americans went to bed, unaware that it was the eve of their last day on earth.

For me, that’s surreal. Monday was an ordinary start to the work week. In the evening, people played with their kids, and watched Monday Night Football, and kissed their spouses goodnight. They prepared to go on flights for work, or vacation, or just to make it home. They thought about what bill needed to be paid and the home repair which needed to be completed. They went to sleep like it was any other night and woke up to a beautiful Tuesday morning. Continue reading “The eve of infamy; and where I was on 9/11”

Moving and inspiring: final article from Yale graduate, days before dying in accident


Click here to read “The Opposite of Loneliness” by Marina Keegan

This afternoon, while finding excuses not to read for class, I happened to come across an article which featured the picture of a lovely young woman. I found out that she was a recent Yale graduate who died last week, a mere five days after graduating from the prestigious institution. I read the article, noted what a pity it was, but barely gave it a second thought.

Marina Keegan was riding in a car with her boyfriend in Massachusetts when the young man lost control of the automobile. Keegan died at the scene of the accident, her boyfriend was hospitalized and released shortly after. She had been set to move to New York next month to begin writing for the New Yorker. As an undergraduate, she had been an active force on campus.

Continue reading “Moving and inspiring: final article from Yale graduate, days before dying in accident”

The Miracle Basketball Video and Why Facebook Made it Popular

Since this weekend, I’ve seen over a dozen Facebook friends share the same video of a high school basketball team manager in New York (who had never gotten to play before) who has autism who was put into a game and hit six 3-point shots.

Through Facebook, people marvel at the accomplishment. They call it “Inspiring” and say that it “brings tears to your eyes.” It’s called “a feel good news story.” Continue reading “The Miracle Basketball Video and Why Facebook Made it Popular”

Where I was on 9/11


photo courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons. Julien Menichini

This week, so much has been written about 9/11. So many documentaries and television specials have aired. I haven’t really watched any of it, nor have I read the articles. It’s not that I don’t care about what happened a decade ago. I care a great deal. Like all other Americans who remember that day, September 11, 2001 left an indelible mark on me. But I don’t need a documentary to remember what happened. It’s a day about which I constantly think.
Continue reading “Where I was on 9/11”