Tag: resignation

Willow Creek fallout continues as pastor and elders all resign

Willow_Creek_Community_Church_sign
Willow Creek church was formerly the third largest church in America. A trailblazing church over the past 40 years under the visionary leadership of Bill Hybels. Hybles planned to retire later this year but this past spring, the Chicago Tribune reported about accusations of sexual misconduct. In the fallout, Hybels retried shortly after. The reigns left to Willow pastors Heather Larson and Steve Carter.

This past week, a new story of multiple instance of groping a former secretary, and one sexual act between Hybels and the sectary were reported in the New York Times. On Sunday, Carter resigned.

Last night, at a special meeting, Larson resigned and the elder board of Willow has also announced their resignation.

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Pope Benedict XVI makes modern history with resignation

Courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons
Courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

For the first time since 1415, there will be a living ex-Pope, as Benedict XVI announced today that he will be resigning from the Papacy on February 28.

In leading a church with a billion members and being one of the most influential people in the world, I feel that the fact that he is resigning is a remarkable show of humility and something which should be applauded. I’m not sure how conservative Catholics will receive this. But for those outside the church (and for more nominal Catholics), I think that the pope’s recognition of his failing health and his inability to execute the job to the necessary degree of aplomb is in the best interest of the Church.

Resignation of Jim Tressel: 1 year later

Photo courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons
Courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons
One year ago today, as I woke up in the late morning, I learned that Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel had resigned. A couple of months before, when the news that Tressel had lied about rules violations became public knowledge, in a press conference, a reporter asked if Tressel was going to be dismissed. With all of the public savvy of Joe Biden, university president E. Gordon Gee infamously quipped, “I’m just hoping that the coach doesn’t dismiss me.” Later, Tressel coached in the spring game, and preparations were underway for the 2011 season.

But on Memorial Day, suddenly, the era was over. It was a dark day for the program and for the fans. For a decade, Tressel had been a source of stability. It had seemed like he was weathering the scandal. But then, suddenly, it was over.