Tag: theology

Scripture and the Reformation: our infallible authority

pexels-photo-250609.jpeg

500 years ago this month, the history of the church, of Europe, and of the western world were forever changed in the town of Wittenberg Germany. Martin Luther wrote his 95 theses, a list of grievances against corrupt and unbiblical practices within the Catholic Church. The impact of this event continues to ripple throughout the Christian world.

Luther was not the first person to call for reform in the church. Continue reading “Scripture and the Reformation: our infallible authority”

A Sinner’s Guide to Repentance

DSC_0698.JPG

Repentance is sincere remorse or regret for an action. Theologically, repentance is associated with the idea of turning away from sin and turning to God.

James 4:7-10 gives what’s almost like a “how to” guide for repentance. It’s not exhaustive, but he says five things that are important to repentance.

1. Repentance involve submission to God

Repentance isn’t just about moralism. It’s about an actual desire for God.

It’s not “well I’ll just drink less” or “get control my temper better.” It’s not just “don’t do that,” but it’s a turning to God. It’s recognizing that God is greater than your sin, that he is better. That his ways are better. That turning from sin is turning to a better way. Continue reading “A Sinner’s Guide to Repentance”

The start of graduate school: a new chapter

I start graduate school this week. A little over three years ago, when I graduated from college, I always knew that I would be back. If you had asked me at the time, I probably wouldn’t have expected it to take three years. But things come up, and life never quite seems to go as we would have planned.

I’m very excited to be going to Trinity Evangelical Divinity Continue reading “The start of graduate school: a new chapter”

The genetics challenge on Adam and Eve


NPR ran a story a few weeks ago that I came across on the Richard Dawkins blog.

It talks about how more scholars within the theology community are acknowledging a disbelief that Adam and Eve were literally the first two human beings on earth given the vast evidence to the contrary within the Human Genome Project. Genetically, humans cannot all be related to two individual people; the scholars concede. Continue reading “The genetics challenge on Adam and Eve”