Tag: tragedy

20 little faces

I think of those 20 kids. Those 20 little faces. 20 people who had all of the potential in the world. 20 innocent people, who despite all of the evil, and discontent in our society and in our world, were still at an age when they hadn’t yet been corrupted. I think of 20 kids who got up and went to school, like it was any other day, who eagerly awaited the weekend (and who even more eagerly awaited the upcoming holiday and a visit from Santa).

What could have been going through their minds when a 20 year old man started shooting? Did they cry? Did they hide? Did they comprehend what was happening?

I think about those parents. Those 20 sets of parents whose worlds are crashing down on them today. Parents who had the normal frustrations of life yesterday and who are now experiencing pain that most of us will never have to imagine. Waiting to wake up from this terrible dream, still in disbelief that this could have happened, longing to rewind time, and knowing life will never be quite the same. 20 sets of parents who kissed their babies goodbye this morning or last night and who took for granted that they would see them tonight and that they would be safe and that all would be right, at least in their worlds.

Infant in iconic photo would have turned 18 today; story behind the picture

Image

As the old saying goes, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” But it seems that each generation has only a handful of pictures which capture the essence of major events. This photo of a firefighter cradling a baby in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City Bombing is one of the most famous photographs taken during the 1990s. The baby is a symbol for those who were lost in the tragic attack. She is a symbol of innocence, venerability, and woundedness. The firefighter is a symbol for American society. Immortalized with his expression are the concern and mourning of the people and a desire to rush to the aid of those in need.

The perspective tragedy gives on what really matters

It’s so easy to lose perspective. It’s so easy to complain out of habit, to get frustrated when things don’t go perfectly. We have our waiter make a mistake with an order and respond like they’ve committed some type of wartime atrocity.

We complain and we get bitter. I think it’s not because the things about which we complain are so important, but because complaining becomes our comfort zone. Instead of just being happy and finding joy in everyday life, we treat anger like a warm blanket and wrap ourselves in it.