Tag: book review

The Problem of Pain: C.S. Lewis and human suffering

painOriginally published November 14, 2012 as “The Problem of Pain and C.S. Lewis”

Early in the book “The Problem of Pain,” in an analogy which is the epitome of the brilliance and humor of C.S. Lewis, he compares the relationship of God and man to that of a dog owner and his dog. It is for the dog owner’s joy that he owns the dog. It is not inherently for the dog’s joy. It is also so that the owner has another being that it can love. The master values the dog loving him too, but to mature the dog, there are things which must be done that might not always be pleasant for the canine. Being washed, trained not to steal, and the dreaded process of house training are all part of the process. But in the end, those unpleasant activities are for the good of the dog.

With his rapier wit, Lewis writes, “To the puppy the whole proceeding would seem, if it were a theologian, to cast grave doubts on the ‘goodness’ of man: but the full-grown and full-trained dog, larger, healthier, and longer-loved than the wild dog…would have no such doubts.”

The Problem of Pain: C.S. Lewis and human suffering

painOriginally published November 14, 2012 as “The Problem of Pain and C.S. Lewis”

Early in the book “The Problem of Pain,” in an analogy which is the epitome of the brilliance and humor of C.S. Lewis, he compares the relationship of God and man to that of a dog owner and his dog. It is for the dog owner’s joy that he owns the dog. It is not inherently for the dog’s joy. It is also so that the owner has another being that it can love. The master values the dog loving him too, but to mature the dog, there are things which must be done that might not always be pleasant for the canine. Being washed, trained not to steal, and the dreaded process of house training are all part of the process. But in the end, those unpleasant activities are for the good of the dog.

With his rapier wit, Lewis writes, “To the puppy the whole proceeding would seem, if it were a theologian, to cast grave doubts on the ‘goodness’ of man: but the full-grown and full-trained dog, larger, healthier, and longer-loved than the wild dog…would have no such doubts.”

The Problem of Pain and C.S. Lewis

Early in the book “The Problem of Pain,” in an analogy which is the epitome of the brilliance and humor of C.S. Lewis, he compares the relationship of God and man to that of a dog owner and his dog. It is for the dog owner’s joy that he owns the dog. It is inherently for the dog’s joy. It is also so that the owner has another being that it can love. The master values the dog loving him too, but to mature the dog, there are things which must be done that might not always be pleasant for the canine. Being washed, trained not to steal, and the dreaded process of house training are all part of the process. But in the end, those unpleasant activities are for the good of the dog. With his rapier wit, Lewis writes, “To the puppy the whole proceeding would seem, if it were a theologian, to cast grave doubts on the ‘goodness’ of man: but the full-grown and full-trained dog, larger, healthier, and longer-loved than the wild dog…would have no such doubts.”

Critical look at “Once upon a secret,” new book about JFK

Last week I gave high praise to the new book Once Upon a Secret: my affair with President John F. Kenedy and its aftermath by Mimi Alford. I believe that it’s a well written and enjoyable book. That being said, I do think that it is at least fair to mention that some of Alford’s claims need to potentially be taken with a certain degree of scepticism.

In her discussion of working in the Kennedy White House, many of the people she claims had knowledge of her affair with the president are now deceased. Furthermore, given the nature of her relationship with Kennedy, it was hidden from outsiders, which makes her claims difficult to verify. To believe what is said in the book, we essentially have to take Alford’s word for it.

New Book “You Are Not So Smart” explains why our sense of self and the world isn’t what we tell ourselves it is

Photo by LOLren, and used in conjunction with Flickr Creative Commons.
Photo from Flickr Creative Commons

For the last couple months, I have been eagerly awaiting the release of the new book “You Are Not So Smart” by David McRaney, author of the fantastic blog of the same name, YouAreNotSoSmart.com.

I laughed, I cried, I thought. Review of “God, No” the new book by Penn Jillette

Penn Jillette: famous magician, outspoken libertarian, well known skeptic, ardent atheist.

Last week, Jillette’s new book “God, No. Signs you may already be an atheist and other magical tales” was released. I am a big fan of Mr. Jillette and was interested to see his new book.